DIABETES PREVENTION: TIPS FOR TAKING CONTROL

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DIABETES PREVENTION: TIPS FOR TAKING CONTROL
DIABETES PREVENTION: TIPS FOR TAKING CONTROL

DIABETES PREVENTION: TIPS FOR TAKING CONTROL

DIABETES PREVENTION: TIPS FOR TAKING CONTROL

 

DIABETES PREVENTION: TIPS FOR TAKING CONTROL
DIABETES PREVENTION: TIPS FOR TAKING CONTROL

Diabetes is a defect in the body’s ability to convert glucose (sugar) to energy. Glucose is the main source of energy for our body. When food is digested in the body, it is changed into fats, protein, or carbohydrates. Foods that affect blood sugars are called carbohydrates. Carbohydrates (such as bread, rice, pasta, potatoes, corn, fruit, and milk products.), when digested, change to glucose. The glucose is then transferred to the blood and is used by the cells for energy. In order for glucose to be transferred from the blood into the cells, the hormone – insulin is needed. Insulin is produced by pancreas.

In individuals with diabetes, this process is impaired. Diabetes occurs either when insulin is not produced in sufficient quantities (type 1 diabetes) or the insulin produced is defective and cannot move the glucose into the cells (type 2 diabetes). Type 2 is the one that is very predominant. An individual is considered diabetic when the fasting blood sugar is 126mg/dl and above or the random fasting blood sugar is 200mg/dl and above.

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When it comes to type 2 diabetes, prevention is a big deal. It’s especially important to make diabetes prevention a priority if you are at increased risk of diabetes, for example, if you’re overweight or have a family history of the disease.

Diabetes prevention is as basic as eating healthy, becoming more physically active and losing a few extra pounds — and it’s never too late to start. Making a few simple changes in your lifestyle now may help you avoid the serious health complications of diabetes down the road, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage.

Here are the latest diabetes prevention tips;

1. Get more physical activity: There are many benefits of regular physical activity. Exercise can help you lose weight, lower your blood sugar and boost your sensitivity to insulin — which helps keep your blood sugar within a normal range

2. Get plenty of fibre: Fibre is rough and tough but it may help you reduce your risk of diabetes by improving your blood sugar control; lower your risk of heart disease and promote weight loss by helping you feel full. Foods high in fiber include fruits, vegetables, beans, whole grains, nuts, and seeds.

3. Go for whole grains: Whole grains may reduce your risk of diabetes and help maintain blood sugar levels. Try to make at least half your grains whole grains. Many foods made from whole grains come ready to eat, including various breads, pasta products and many kinds of cereal.

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4. Lose extra weight: If you’re overweight, diabetes prevention may hinge on weight loss. Every pound you lose can improve your health, and you may be surprised by how much.

5. Skip fat diets and just make healthier choices: Low-carb diets, the glycemic index diet or other fat diets may help you lose weight at first, but their effectiveness at preventing diabetes isn’t known nor are their long-term effects. And by excluding or strictly limiting a particular food group, you may be giving up essential nutrients. Instead, think variety and portion control as part of an overall healthy-eating plan.

When to see your doctor: If you’re older than age 45 and your weight is normal, ask your doctor if diabetes testing is appropriate for you. Blood glucose screening is recommended if:

(a) You’re age 45 or older and overweight

(b) You’re younger than age 45 and overweight with one or more additional risk factors for type 2 diabetes — such as a sedentary lifestyle or a family history of diabetes

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Share your concerns about diabetes prevention with your doctor. He or she will applaud your efforts to keep diabetes at bay, and perhaps offer additional suggestions based on your medical history or other factors.

DIABETES PREVENTION: TIPS FOR TAKING CONTROL